Ten things I learned at a Taekwondo Extravaganza:

IMG_8664
Holy Buckets!
  1. I think a better name for it would be “Bow Fest”.
  2. If you yell “Hiyaa” really loud while doing anything, you might win a trophy or a medal.
  3. There are actually boards you can buy that can be broken and be put back together — only to be broken again (God, I wish I would have thought of that)!
  4. There is a special way that you tie your belt. The knot should look like a fortune cookie. I don’t see the fortune cookie, but I am hungry because…
  5. They last a very long time! Pack a lunch.
  6. The medals and trophies are some of the coolest I have ever seen.
  7. There is something called a pattern competition where each athlete must perform a sequence of moves in order to place high. Some of these patterns require nothing more than fine finger movements and/or placements. It is actually impressive to watch a ten-year-old memorize and perform a 16-sequence pattern.
  8. Two first-graders sparing against each other is probably one of the funniest/cutest things you will ever see.
  9. Taekwondo does not discriminate. You can be differing sizes, abilities, athleticism, and/or backgrounds and still earn top honors in a respective event – which means that there is still hope for me!
  10. Taekwondo requires masterful concentration and hours of preparation. It has actually done wonders for my daughter.
IMG_8686
To the victor…

Father of the Year Moment #641 – Leadership (I thank God every day for the mentors I had growing up):

Earlier this year, My oldest daughter and I had a conversation about leadership on and off the basketball court. Since her father is very long winded, she got more than she wanted:
Okay. you want to be a leader, then be a leader. But be careful; you will be criticized for your decisions. Everybody wants to take a leadership role until it is time for the criticism. As soon as the criticism comes, they will tuck their tale and hide in the shadows. Don’t hide from it; Learn from it. Use it to make yourself and the people around you better.
If you want to be a leader, then take adversity head on. If you are truly right about something, then you have to fight for it; be smart about how you choose to fight. Choose craftiness over brute force.
If you want to be a leader, then know that there are two things that are extremely dangerous to you, and to your group – sincere ignorance, and conscientious stupidity. Eliminate both.
If you want to be a leader, you need to be dynamic. Know the differing types of leadership and apply the correct type of leadership as situations arise. Find a balance between using data and using your heart in decision making. Too much data, and people will think that you are cold, too much heart, and people will think you are blinding yourself to what is right in front of you.
If you want to be a leader, then represent the whole. Leaders never speak as individuals, they are always representative of the team. Give the team the credit when things go right, take the blame when things go wrong. When they do go wrong, first look at yourself as part of the problem, then assess if there are people who are the problem – deal with them head on. If you have something to say, then say it to their faces. Never hide amongst the faction – that’s cowardice.
If you want to lead, then be quiet and lead by example. Anybody can be loud and demanding to get things done. Leaders themselves do what needs to be done. Leaders influence others without them knowing that they are being lead. They lead because there is a need. When people see you are willing fulfill that need, they will follow. When you choose to speak up, speak up for things that you are passionate about and are willing to sacrifice for – you may be called to do so.
If you want to lead, then don’t expect a leadership title. Leaders don’t need titles. Even if you get a title, nobody gives a damn. Leaders are leaders because they work harder than the rest. Make sure you work hard when people are not looking at you; share your hard work when they are. You do not need a statue to tell you how nice you are. Let others talk about your work ethic; you don’t need to proclaim it. Work behind the scenes.
If you want to be a leader, then expect to sacrifice greatly. You will sacrifice time; you will need it to perfect your craft. You will sacrifice friends; your friends will see the path you’ve chosen and understand. You will sacrifice relationships unless you choose people who are on your path and/or have common interests. It will be trying, but remember – the difference between a moment and a movement is sacrifice.
If you want to lead, then expect the haters. You will have critics everywhere. People will say, “Well, I would’ve done it this way…” But don’t listen – they’ve never done it. When asked to step up, they never will.
If you want to lead, then expect to be alone. Not so much “by yourself” physically (that will also happen), but mentally. You are carving out a path, and that path holds uncertainty. Uncertainty is uncomfortable. Uniformity is comfortable. If you want to lead, always choose uncertainty.

Leadership is not easily attained and is even harder to keep. Leadership isn’t for everyone. So, if you choose to follow, that’s okay. Just choose who you follow wisely. Don’t let someone tell you that they are leading you to the mountain top, only to find yourself in a crevasse.

Something tells me that she will never ask for advice again…

Administrative Stoicism

By Youthsportsstuff.com

I’ve found that several of the stoic teachers of the past provided useful lessons for anyone in a leadership role. It’s difficult to define stoicism quickly, but perhaps the best, brief description is that stoicism is based on the idea that we can only control ourselves.

Source: Administrative Stoicism

Ten Things I Have Noticed About Myself When I am Totally Pissed Off at my Wife.

  1. I am most likely pissed off about something that is very trivial (in the grand scheme of things).
  2. I am so stubborn, that I have strung an argument longer than I should have.
  3. While angry, I have concocted 99 other reasons why she is wrong and does not deserve my company. Around 98.5 are totally untrue (it is the other way around).
  4. A simple, “I am sorry,” Or, “this is stupid” would’ve ended the argument, but I am too good for that shit.
  5. Most, if not all, of the arguments begin because she screwed something up trying to make life easier for me.
  6. In an act of desperation, and not being able to prove or articulate my point, I will grab a dictionary/thesaurus/reference guide to make Heather look like she does not know what she is talking about.
  7. During the argument, the more time I spend apart from Heather, the more time I have to feaster and contemplate negativity (neither of which are constructive nor relative to the issue at hand).

8. I should just go to the gym.

9. I have probably not eaten enough carbs.

10. I should consider the fact that we both are at a point in our lives where sleep is not much of an option. I should probably shut my mouth as living with me qualifies her for sainthood.

Bonus:

She is right,

She is right,

She is right.

Well, shit.

Father of the Year moment #30: WTF

Stopping yourself from kicking ass and taking names after discovering that your kids found the formula to create an instant indoor skating rink.

FYI: water+ Dawn dish soap+ garage floor= skating rink (make sure to use a broom to spread evenly).

10 Things That I Have Learned From Coaching My Daughter’s Youth Girls’ Basketball Teams

  1. The girls team game seems to be more organized: In between games in any particular tournament, I get to watch some of the youth boys play. My, oh, my – it is impressive how many fouls occur in one half. When a person goes up for a lay-up, it sounds like a round of applause.
  2. Parents will cheer extra loud as a way to intimidate your team: This is extremely annoying. Parents who do this end up with a reputation. As you are reading this, at least two parents came to mind, didn’t they?
  3. You have to be very versatile in your coaching: There is definitely a fine line between pushing your athletes to be better and being overbearing. Some players need to be poked with a stick, while others need constant, polite encouragement. Know the difference! There is nothing worse than a girl crying while she is running up and down the court. Yup, you look like an asshole.
  4. Not everybody follows the tournament rules: If the tournament rules say “no zone defense”, then you probably shouldn’t have your tallest player(s) standing in the paint – that is not the definition of help defense. It is youth basketball. You’re an asshole.
  5. Poor, poor, referees: Although some are terrible (there’s no denying that), it does not give you a reason to yell or belittle them. Look, I was a ref, and I know first-hand that there is no “winning” for them. They go home with minimal pay and no trophy to show for it. There is a reason why there are not enough of them to go around. Either as a parent, or as a coach, try shaking their hand and telling them thank you after every game – no matter the outcome.
  6. Some teams choose not to develop all of their players: In high school constantly played summer high school basketball tournaments against teams who where ranked in the USA Today Top 25 (this was in 1998, before ESPN and MaxPreps showcased all of them). A common theme among a lot of those teams is that some players where way more developed than others, which, to me was sad, because those under-performing players were only glad just to be on a great team. The same happens in youth basketball; just because you have an athlete who is a 5’11” fifth-grade beast in the post now, does not mean that she will be the tallest person on the court when she is in high school. If she stops growing (and has minimal ball-handling skills), backing her opponents down in the post for a layup will not be much of an option.
  7. The most aggressive girls usually win: This does not mean that your girls have to fight, cheat, or be dirty to win. But they do have to have a “never back down,” “never say die attitude.” If you have a group that isn’t afraid to get on the ground and mess up their uniforms, consider yourself extremely fortunate.
  8. Always remember the social aspect: For the most part, it’s true – girls just want to have fun. If they are not having fun, they will usually quit the sport sometime around sixth grade.
  9. Be careful about scheduling games: There are so many tournaments out there (damn near 3 to 5 per week). If you are not careful, you could end up playing in a tournament every week from December until June. And with each tournament having a three-game minimum, you team could end up with a rigid NBA schedule. Yikes!
  10. Go with the hand you are dealt: Sure, you can recruit the best of the best in your neighborhood or city, but there is something about playing with the team you got. You will go through your bumps and bruises, but you will end up with a great return on your investment.

2018-04-07-14-25-13.jpg

Bonus – Eater beware: Travel squad itself can be spendy venture,  but the concession stands are enough to break the bank. There are plenty of cheap meal options when you are in a well-populated city, but if the venue is in the middle of nowhere, pack your lunch.

Create a website or blog at WordPress.com

Up ↑

MyNBASource

Latest Basketball News for YOU.

Parenting a Monster.

Parenting a small child is not easy.

denise's Resume Service

Personalized & Innovative Resume's

Storyshucker

A blog full of humorous and poignant observations.

J. A. Allen

Scribbles on Cocktail Napkins

3cupsofcafe

By Merly

InkBlots and IceBergs

musings on life | bits of psychology | attempts at poetry

Balance and Risk

One Life - Live It!